This Collection of 1980’s Retro Macintosh Programs Can Still Be Used in Your Browser

For millennials today, life without Facebook or Snapchat is no life at all. But can you imagine what it was like in the pre-Windows era when there was no internet yet and people had to navigate on black and white interfaces? If you want to go back in time, or simply want to experience those retro days, there’s a new tool that can take you back to those 1980’s programs. The Internet Archive has created 40 emulators of Apple programs released from 1984 to 1989 that can be played inside your browser.

rm1 This Collection of 1980’s Retro Macintosh Programs Can Still Be Used in Your Browser

Image Source | Youtube.com

This includes programs such as MacWrite and classic games like Frogger, Pyramid of Peril and the classic Space Invaders. It even includes full versions of MacOS System 6.0.8 and 7.0.1 so you can relive your childhood computing nostalgia. For example, you can browse a Mac running a 1991 MacOS 7.0.1 that has various software already “installed.” The operating system lets you explore MacPaint as well as take a look through retro Microsoft Word.

rm5 This Collection of 1980’s Retro Macintosh Programs Can Still Be Used in Your Browser

Image Source | Youtube.com

According to the Internet Archive official blog, “If you’ve not experienced the original operating system for the Macintosh family of computers, it’s an interesting combination of well-worn conventions in the modern world, along with choices that might seem strange or off-the-mark. At the time the machine was released, however, they landed new ideas in the hands of a worldwide audience and gained significant fans and followers almost immediately. Enjoy this (9-inch, black and white) window into computer history.”

Video Courtesy of Youtube:

The Internet Archive is a non-profit digital library offering free global access to books, movies and music, as well as 286 billion archived web pages. Other pages that serve as time capsules for the web’s past include CNN’s 1996 OJ Simpson coverage, and the oldest continuously running webcam in San Francisco that went live in 1994. These are stored on the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine that logs obscure and archived websites, software, and video.

Examples from the Wayback Machine include the 1996 Space Jam website that shows the film’s logo on a background of stars. It reveals behind-the-scenes information about the cast and crew, audio from the film and includes a bio of lead star Michael Jordan. The OJ Simpson coverage, from CNN, features headings that provide details about the witnesses, the suspects, evidence and the murder, and all are illustrated using Clip Art.

In 1994, as part of a student project, a webcam was installed at the San Francisco State University to monitor fog in the region. The camera is still live and is still streaming footage 24 hours a day. Another interactive Warner Bros site was created in 1998 to promote You’ve Got Mail, starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. It lets users read the emails between the two characters, using a virtual inbox, and an instant messenger pop-up details other dialogue from the film. There is even a Washington Post archive from 1996 featuring the Macarena dance in its In Style section. This was the year the site was launched: “The nation embraced the internet as a new method of communicating, and The Washington Post began publishing on the Web in June with the launch of WashingtonPost.com.”

Leave a Reply