Nintendo 3DS getting huge price slash to $170 next month

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There’s no denying that the Nintendo 3DS is one innovative piece of gaming hardware. Glasses-free 3D for the masses? That’s pretty cool. Unfortunately, at $250, it was just too expensive. Nintendo has now recognized that and they’re cutting the MSRP down to a more affordable $169.99.

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HTC EVO 3D ships with Sprint, heading to Europe too

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All it takes is a tipping point. The iPhone represented a tipping point for touchscreen smartphones for regular consumers. The iPad represented a tipping point for the popularity of tablets. And perhaps the Nintendo 3DS (despite being bad for kids) represents the tipping point for glasses-free stereoscopic 3D. Joining the fray is the HTC EVO 3D, which starting shipping with Sprint in the United States earlier this week.

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Nintendo 3DS Games Not Dependent on 3D to Play

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Let’s put this into perspective. Let’s say that you decide to buy one of the many Rock Band games for your Xbox 360, but you’re not at all interested in the plastic instruments. So, you figure out a way to play Rock Band using a regular Xbox 360 controller. What’s the point? By the same accord, let’s say that you can play Dance Central for Kinect by tapping the buttons on a Street Fighter arcade stick. Again, what’s the point?

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Glasses-Free 3D Fake

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While we suspected the video of French director François Vogel having eyelid spasms while testing out a glasses-free 3D technology was a hoax, I asked an optometrist to tell me how much legitimacy the video had and here is what Jean-Marie Hanssens, who uses 3D to test binocular vision, had to say; “Blinking as fast as in the web video can generate various eye problems such as dry eye, corneal and lid irritations, lid spasms.”

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Glasses-free 3D safe, unless you’re using Jonathan Post’s prototype

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One of the big drawbacks surrounding 3DTVs are the active shutter glasses that must be worn for 3D viewing, running up to $200 per pair. A glasses-free 3DTV technology has begun circulating the internet in a video hosted at JonathanPost.com, who we don’t know much about. The experiment was Conducted by Luis Carone and managed by Daniel Dias, in it is French director François Vogel.

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